FlexJobs Review: A Feature-Rich Work-From-Home Resource

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How to Find Remove Jobs with Flexjobs

More and more employers are offering remote jobs, and more and more job seekers want the kind of flexible schedule that remote work affords. The problem is, many of the work from home jobs that you find online are scams.

Fortunately, there’s a job board where you can find legitimate work that you can do from the comfort of your home.

Our FlexJobs review gives you all the details you need to find a high-quality telecommuting opportunity.

FlexJobs Review: The Basics

FlexJobs is a job board that lists postings for work-at-home jobs. Unlike many similar sites out there, FlexJobs is not primarily geared towards freelancers. FlexJobs’ listings are largely for ongoing and permanent positions with companies, not one-off projects. And every single job opportunity that you see on FlexJobs has been vetted, so you can rest assured that all FlexJobs are legit.

FlexJobs has listings from hundreds of companies, and many of them are household names like Aetna, Amazon, Dell and SAP. There are thousands of listings under more than two dozen job categories, including entry-level, data entry, accounting, finance, HR and marketing.

See also: Amazon Work-From-Home Jobs: What’s Available and How to Get Them.

Who Is FlexJobs For?

It goes without saying that FlexJobs is great for people who are looking for a job that allows them to telecommute. But the site will be most beneficial if you’re willing to be — pardon the pun — somewhat flexible. If you meet that criteria, you can find hundreds of jobs, from entry-level to senior management level.

For example, in the site’s search engine (pictured below), I selected “Senior Level Manager” in the Career Level box, “Partial Remote Work” in the Remote Work Level box, and “Yes, a bit” under the Willing to Travel box. I left all of the other parameters blank.

FlexJobs Advanced Search Function
FlexJobs’ advanced search function offers a number of powerful filters.

With those criteria, I found 690 job listings. I added a keyword (“Video Games”), and found 220 listings under the same parameters.

The site is very robust if you can be a little flexible.

Who Owns and Operates the Site?

FlexJobs was founded by Sara Sutton in 2007, and Sutton is the CEO of the company. She had previously founded an employment service, and saw that both employers and job seekers were increasingly looking for people open to remote/off-site work.

The company is headquartered in Boulder, Colorado, and employs around 20 people. FlexJobs is now the best-rated job board for those looking for flexible jobs and remote opportunities, with an A+ rating from the Better Business Bureau (BBB) and a five star (out of five) rating based on nearly 100 user reviews.

Membership Fees

As you can imagine, a lot of resources go into making sure that thousands of job listings are legitimate. Making sure FlexJobs members don’t get scammed is a core principle of the company. In order to pay the employees researching every single posting, FlexJobs is a paid membership site.

FlexJobs pricing and membership tiers
FlexJobs offers three different pricing tiers.

Every subscription includes:

  • Unlimited access to all job postings.
  • A profile.
  • Free skills testing.
  • Email alerts when new job postings are added.
  • Expert advice on making your job search successful.
  • A portfolio for your resume and examples of your work.

You can cancel your subscription at any time, and that cancellation will either go into effect immediately or at the expiration date of your paid subscription period.

FlexJobs Promo Code: Save 30% off your monthly membership fee when you use this link and enter the code WEALTH at checkout.

How to Find Remote Work on FlexJobs

FlexJobs’ interface is easy to use. Everything is clearly laid out and simple to navigate.

Dashboard

Your dashboard is the screen from which you’ll navigate FlexJobs.com.

FlexJobs Dashboard
The FlexJobs Dashboard.
  • Advanced Search: This allows you to filter jobs based on several criteria (which we’ll go over below).
  • Recent Activity: Here you can see recently viewed and saved jobs, saved searches, and application history.
  • Resume Profiles: Create your profile, including a title. There’s a box to click that will give you some tips on creating the right profile title. FlexJobs recommends having multiple resume profiles for scenarios like same industry/new position, same industry/various positions, same industry/telecommuting position, completely new career field, new industry/same position, and new industry/new position. When you have more than one resume profile, you can select the one you want to send to a potential employer.
  • View New Jobs of Interest: This tab shows you new jobs that are most relevant to your searches. In order to populate it, you need to first start a Resume Profile.
  • Skills Test: There are assorted professional skills tests you can take to help highlight your strengths. Your results will show on your Resume Profile so that potential employers can see them. You can see your results in this tab, too.
  • Account Settings: Here you can manage your contact information, password, billing, upgrade or cancel your subscription, and find the FAQ section.
  • Member Savings: Here you can get discounts on a variety of offers and services, like a 20% discount on Grammarly, specials from Dell, and a one month free trial to LinkedIn Learning.
  • This Week’s News: This is a weekly roundup of FlexJobs in the news.

Searching Jobs

There are dozens of job categories on FlexJobs, but don’t be overwhelmed. With the excellent Advanced Search feature, you can narrow down the listings to the most relevant opportunities for you.

FlexJobs work categories
FlexJobs job categories.

There are 11 criteria you can use to hone your search:

  • Keywords: I found that it’s best to be broad here. Use “Video Game” rather than “Video Game Developer,” for example. That’s because employers may not always write a post in a way that allows it to get through a keyword search that’s too specific.
  • U.S. Location: Filter by city, state or zip code. Some employers and some positions prefer (or even require) that employees are in the same geographical area as the company — even if the work is 100% remote. If a company has that requirement and you try to apply despite being outside that area, FlexJobs will show you a message stating you’re outside the area to apply for that job.
  • Job Types: Employee, freelance or temporary.
  • Categories: These are the job categories, and some of them can be further refined.
  • Career Level: Select from entry-level, experienced, manager, or senior level manager.
  • Featured & Award-Winning Employers: Here you’ll find categories like Top 100 Remote, Best Company to Work for In X (various states), and Happiest Companies in America.
  • Exclude Words: Sometimes it’s just as important to know what you don’t want to do as what you do want to do!
  • International: If you’re not in the U.S., or if you want to work for an international company, you can choose from a list of countries.
  • Work Schedule: Part-time, occasional, short-term, etc.
  • Remote Work Level: Any Level, 100% Remote, Partial Remote Work, Option for Remote Work.

Applying to Jobs

When you find an interesting job listing, click on it and you’ll see the full details of that job, including the main responsibilities and the required/desired skills. At the bottom of the page, you’ll see the icon that will take you to the company’s application page. Follow their procedure to apply for the job.  

Example of a job posting on FlexJobs
Only paid members can see the application details.

Additional Resources and Perks of Membership

FlexJobs is a lot more than just a job board. It has some great benefits for its members.

  • Skills testing: You can take a test for more than 170 skills, ranging from computer skills to healthcare to personality tests. If you score above 70%, the score will show on your profile and the only employers who can see it are those you apply to from FlexJobs or those who find your resume on the site.
  • Resume profiles: This is where employers can search for potential employees. You can import your LinkedIn profile, which will populate much of this screen and attach your resume. You don’t have to fill out everything from scratch.
  • Members-only videos: These are webinars on subjects like resume tips and how to make a career change.
  • Learning Center: The Learning Center is a great resource. It offers courses on things like recovering from a layoff, working remotely, and building a flexible career. There are also downloadable guides on subjects like how to start working from home and returning to the workforce after having children.  
  • Discounted resume and career coaching: Professional services include practicing interview skills, resume review, and help to best showcase your skills.

The FlexJobs Blog: A Treasure Trove of Content

The FlexJobs blog has hundreds of pages of valuable content, making it one of the best resources on the site. Plus, it’s free to access and open to non-members.

Topics range from things like starting a new career later in life to the biggest interview mistakes people make, as well as timely topics like how to work from home with kids during an emergency.

The blog posts are informative and engaging, and definitely worth checking out even if you don’t sign up for the site.

FlexJobs Alternatives

If you have a full-time job and are just looking to pick up some freelance work, FlexJobs may not be the right fit. The sites below are more geared to people in that situation.

  • Upwork: This site is the biggest freelance marketplace online, featuring thousands of postings across dozens of categories. You can find one-off projects as well as long-term work.
  • Fiverr: If you’re new to freelancing, this site is a good place to get some experience. There are hundreds different opportunities that allow you to monetize almost any skill or talent imaginable, but the pay can be pretty low.
  • Guru: Similar to Upwork, but the interface is not as slick and there are far fewer job listings.
  • ProBlogger: This site is dedicated to those looking for freelance writing gigs.

Resource: A detailed guide to getting your first job on Upwork.

Pros and Cons

FlexJobs is a great resource, but it won’t quite fit the bill for everyone.

Pros:

  • Hand-screened job listings means there are no scams. Scammers are sophisticated, and no matter how smart you are, you could fall prey to one. You won’t have to worry about that on FlexJobs.
  • Wide range of industries and job categories. If you think the only careers that allow employees to work from home are customer service, proofreading and writing, think again. There are so many opportunities on FlexJobs and many of them are not what you would consider typical remote jobs.
  • Great search, sort and filtering ability. Applying and interviewing for jobs is a chore, and it’s aggravating to go through the process only to find out the job is not what you were looking for. With nearly a dozen filters available on FlexJobs, you’re less likely to waste your time applying for the “wrong” job.
  • Can set up email notifications. Searching for a job is sometimes as much about timing as a good resume. Getting alerts when a job that fits your criteria is posted means you won’t miss an opportunity.
  • Money-back guarantee and easy cancellation policy. It only takes a few seconds to cancel your account, and the refund policy is generous.
  • You can set your account to expire after one month. How many times have you signed up for a service only to forget you did so, until you finally notice a charge for something you never really used? That won’t happen with FlexJobs, as you can set up auto-cancel.
  • No ads. FlexJobs’ site is not cluttered with ads. As a membership site, they don’t have to make money via advertising.
  • Perks! FlexJobs has lots of nice extras, like the webinars and discounts available to users.

Cons:

  • No payment protection. When you apply for jobs on many freelancing sites, you do so through the site. As such, those sites can make sure the client pays you. FlexJobs is a middleman, and as such it doesn’t facilitate or guarantee payment.
  • No feedback. If you’re trying to build a freelance or remote work career, client feedback is a big help. On many freelancing sites, clients can post public feedback, and a strong feedback profile can lead to more jobs and better rates. There is no such option on FlexJobs.
  • Not everything is work-from-home. Not all jobs on FlexJobs are 100% remote. Sometimes you may be required to be on-site, and some jobs involve travel.
  • The pay rate is not always listed.

Frequently Asked Questions

These are some of the most commonly asked questions about FlexJobs. If you’re looking for information that wasn’t covered in this review, please let us know by leaving a comment below, and we’ll research the answer and add it to this section.

How much does FlexJobs cost?

The monthly fee is $14.95. You can also opt for a heavily-discounted annual subscription, which costs $49.95 (about 70% less than the monthly price). If you sign up, be sure to use our promo code (WEALTH) to save 30%.

Why pay for FlexJobs when they let you search for free?

While you can search job listings for free, you can’t view the company and application details unless you sign up for a membership.

How are you paid on FlexJobs?

If you’re hired for an opportunity you find on FlexJobs, you’ll be paid directly by your new employer — usually via direct deposit to your bank account, but sometimes via paper check or PayPal. Unlike Upwork and Fiverr, FlexJobs does not facilitate payments and has no role in the payment process.

Why are some job titles blue on FlexJobs?

When you’re viewing listings on the site, you’ll see job titles in two colors: orange and blue. Orange titles are listings that have been posted directly to the site by vetted and verified “featured employers.” In other words, these are companies that have been screened by FlexJobs and have been given permission to post jobs on the site without having each one reviewed by the site’s staff. Blue titles are listings where the specific job has been researched and vetted by FlexJobs’ staff. They may come from companies that are not “featured employers.”

How frequently does FlexJobs update their listings?

New jobs are added daily, but some users have reported that job listings aren’t always removed from the site in a timely manner — meaning that they applied for positions that were no longer available.

How much do skills tests matter in FlexJobs?

Skills tests are becoming less important overall in the remote jobs/freelancing employment space. For example, Upwork recently removed them from freelancer profiles and is completely ending its skills testing program.

The reason for this is simple: people were cheating by sharing the questions online.

So while having a successful skill listed on your profile may help you get noticed or get a foot in the door, we wouldn’t recommend spending too much time on them.

FlexJobs Review Summary: Is It Worth It?

If you’ve been looking for work-from-home opportunities on other sites, you’ve probably been met with a lot of frustration — things like wading through listings that are clearly scams, finding mostly entry-level jobs, filling out your resume details over and over again on each new site, and sifting through hundreds of jobs because there are not enough search filters to narrow them down.

FlexJobs not only solves all of those frustrations, but it is also just a really good job hunting resource. There is a tremendous amount of help and information available on and through the site designed to help you land not just any job, but a job you’ll love.

Additional reading: 33 Legit Online Jobs That Pay $50,000+ From Home.

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